Extroverted Recluse

Curious minds inquire here.   Hi! I'm a twenty-something year old humanoid; & these are the things from the net that please my eyes and/or mind.

twitter.com/_Dopetacular:

    Sign Up For Amazon Student →

    m-forty-two:

    mangoestho:

    theuppitynegras:

    If you’re a college student and you want free two day shipping on thousands of items for 6 months sign up today. You’ll also get Amazon Prime for half off and that comes with a movie/tv show streaming service

    I’ve had Amazon Student for 4 years— it’s amazing. After your trial is up you get to renew for about half the price of a regular Prime membership. And now it comes with Prime Music, which is like Spotify Premium!

    (Source: mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers, via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

    — 11 hours ago with 2906 notes
    BREAKING: Missouri legislator pushed to have names of police in officer involved shootings kept secret →

    knowledgeequalsblackpower:

    afro-dominicano:

    thepoliticalfreakshow:

    Democratic Missouri State Representative Jeff Roorda-D Barnhart introduced a bill in the Missouri Legislature to keep the name of police officers who shoot someone in the line of duty a secret.

    Roorda said he introduced the bill in 2009 out of safety concerns for police officers.

    “Releasing a name could put someone in grave jeopardy,” Roorda said.

    Roorda is also the business manager of the St. Louis Police Officers’ Association. The bill would have prevented the public from obtaining any records and documents involving police shootings if those documents contained the name of the officer who pulled the trigger.

    Roorda said he was concerned about retaliation.

    “That someone would retaliate, think they did something wrong and try to hurt them or their family,” Roorda said.

    The bill never became law. The Police Officer’s Association eventually reached a compromise with the St. Louis Police Department. The department agreed to not release the name of the officer if it felt the officer could face a threat. After the compromise, Roorda decided not to pursue the legislation.

    Roorda said he is concerned about the safety of Darren Wilson, the officer who shot Michael Brown, Jr, but Roorda is not commenting on the decision to release Wilson’s name.

    “I’m not going to second guess Chief Jackson for releasing it, just like I’m not going to second guess him if he had not released it,” Roorda said.

    Roorda said he has no plans to re-introduce the legislation. He said state law says the decision to release the name of an officer involved in a shooting must be done on a case by case basis.

    The protecting white cop criminals fad is getting old af real fast.

    racism is a system

    if you didn’t get it then, you should get it now people! 

    (via whitepeoplesaidwhat)

    — 12 hours ago with 1725 notes

    thedailyboard:

    “UNASSEMBLED” skateboard deck by Jeremy Schiavo

    The Daily Board:  follow  |  facebook  |  pinterest  |  twitter  |  submit

    (via thaladyk)

    — 12 hours ago with 70 notes
    wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Vladimir Nabokov
Vladimir Nabokov was born on April 22, 1899 in St. Petersburg, Russia. He was a Russian novelist and critic best known for his distinct writing style.
Nabokov was born into an extremely political and highly cultured family. The Nabokov family fled Russia following the Bolshevik revolution in 1919. The Nabokov home was trilingual. As a child, Nabokov read Edgar Allan Poe, John Keats, H.G. Wells, Leo Tolstoy, Anton Chekov, Gustave Flaubert and more. He studied romance languages and Slavic at Trinity College, Cambridge. He graduated with honors in 1922. 
The following eighteen years he lived in Berlin and Paris, where he wrote in Russian under the pseudonym Vladimir Sirin. He supported himself through translations, lessons in English and lessons in tennis. He, also, composed the first crossword puzzles in Russian. 
In 1940, Nabokov was on the move once more after having fled Russia and Germany, he was forced to leave France for the United States.  Nabokov decided to give up writing fiction in Russian and began to compose in English. He exclaimed with great sadness:

"My private tragedy, which cannot, and indeed should not, be anybody’s concern, is that I had to abandon my natural idiom, my untrammeled, rich, and infinitely docile Russian tongue for a second-rate brand of English, devoid of any of those apparatuses—the baffling mirror, the black velvet backdrop, the implied associations and traditions which the native illusionist, frac-tails flying, can magically use to transcend the heritage in his own way."

Despite his feelings of melancholy after abandoning his native language, this period rose Nabokov to fame with arguably his best work, including Lolita. He also worked on translations of his Russian novels into English. He revealed in an interview:

"Lolita is famous, not I. I am an obscure, doubly obscure, novelist with an unpronounceable name."

Lolita was an instant classic and made Nabokov a household name. He wrote Lolita while traveling the west coast in the United States in search of butterflies for his collection. He once declared: 

“Literature and butterflies are the two sweetest passions known to man.”

His career in entomology was as equally distinguished as his writing. He is known for his intricate use of words and heavily ornate writing style. His use of complex plots, alliteration, and playful linguistics make Nabokov’s literature breathtakingly beautiful and pretentious. His attention to language is a surgical artistry defined by the complexity of his prose and characters. It is obvious that his trilingual upbringing had a profound influence over his artistry. During his lifetime he also wrote literary criticism and translated Russian literature, including Alexander Pushkin’s epic, Eugene Onegin. 
After the success of Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov moved back to Europe. He died on July 2, 1977 in Montreux, Switzerland. 
NOTABLE WORKS
Lolita (1955)
Pale Fire (1962)
Speak, Memory (1936–1966)
Ada, or Ardor (1969)
Read excerpts by Vladimir Nabokov here! Get his books here! 
[img src]

    wordsnquotes:

    AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Vladimir Nabokov

    Vladimir Nabokov was born on April 22, 1899 in St. Petersburg, Russia. He was a Russian novelist and critic best known for his distinct writing style.

    Nabokov was born into an extremely political and highly cultured family. The Nabokov family fled Russia following the Bolshevik revolution in 1919. The Nabokov home was trilingual. As a child, Nabokov read Edgar Allan Poe, John Keats, H.G. Wells, Leo Tolstoy, Anton Chekov, Gustave Flaubert and more. He studied romance languages and Slavic at Trinity College, Cambridge. He graduated with honors in 1922. 

    The following eighteen years he lived in Berlin and Paris, where he wrote in Russian under the pseudonym Vladimir Sirin. He supported himself through translations, lessons in English and lessons in tennis. He, also, composed the first crossword puzzles in Russian. 

    In 1940, Nabokov was on the move once more after having fled Russia and Germany, he was forced to leave France for the United States.  Nabokov decided to give up writing fiction in Russian and began to compose in English. He exclaimed with great sadness:

    "My private tragedy, which cannot, and indeed should not, be anybody’s concern, is that I had to abandon my natural idiom, my untrammeled, rich, and infinitely docile Russian tongue for a second-rate brand of English, devoid of any of those apparatuses—the baffling mirror, the black velvet backdrop, the implied associations and traditions which the native illusionist, frac-tails flying, can magically use to transcend the heritage in his own way."

    Despite his feelings of melancholy after abandoning his native language, this period rose Nabokov to fame with arguably his best work, including Lolita. He also worked on translations of his Russian novels into English. He revealed in an interview:

    "Lolita is famous, not I. I am an obscure, doubly obscure, novelist with an unpronounceable name."

    Lolita was an instant classic and made Nabokov a household name. He wrote Lolita while traveling the west coast in the United States in search of butterflies for his collection. He once declared: 

    Literature and butterflies are the two sweetest passions known to man.”

    His career in entomology was as equally distinguished as his writing. He is known for his intricate use of words and heavily ornate writing style. His use of complex plots, alliteration, and playful linguistics make Nabokov’s literature breathtakingly beautiful and pretentious. His attention to language is a surgical artistry defined by the complexity of his prose and characters. It is obvious that his trilingual upbringing had a profound influence over his artistry. During his lifetime he also wrote literary criticism and translated Russian literature, including Alexander Pushkin’s epic, Eugene Onegin

    After the success of Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov moved back to Europe. He died on July 2, 1977 in Montreux, Switzerland. 

    NOTABLE WORKS

    Lolita (1955)

    Pale Fire (1962)

    Speak, Memory (1936–1966)

    Ada, or Ardor (1969)

    Read excerpts by Vladimir Nabokov here! Get his books here

    [img src]

    — 14 hours ago with 189 notes

    The top Black models of the 90’s discuss racism in the fashion industry 

    (Source: howtobeafuckinglady, via stuffwhitepeopleask)

    — 15 hours ago with 1778 notes
    think-progress:

"After months of urging, Krispy Kreme, the American global donut and coffee chain, committed to frying its donuts in palm oil from distributors who aren’t contributing to deforestation. They followed right on the heels of Dunkin’ Donuts, who made a similar commitment on Tuesday."
Good news, Homer! American donuts just got more environmentally friendly.

    think-progress:

    "After months of urging, Krispy Kreme, the American global donut and coffee chain, committed to frying its donuts in palm oil from distributors who aren’t contributing to deforestation. They followed right on the heels of Dunkin’ Donuts, who made a similar commitment on Tuesday."

    Good news, Homer! American donuts just got more environmentally friendly.

    — 15 hours ago with 279 notes
    "Unexpressed emotions will never die. They are buried alive and they will come forth, later, in uglier ways."
    Sigmund Freud (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
    — 16 hours ago with 2566 notes
    emptycarnival:

Best coffee table addition.

    emptycarnival:

    Best coffee table addition.

    — 17 hours ago with 3 notes